PROTEIN CALCULATOR

Higher protein intake is recommended for any active lifestyle.
Find out how much you need here.

Protein Calculator

Whether you are a professional athlete, or are just starting your fitness journey, it can be difficult to know how much protein you should be taking on a daily basis to support your muscle health. How much protein do I need per day? Am I consuming enough protein? Does it matter what time of day I take protein?

Here at Ascent, we want to help answer these questions so you can work hard and help you recover for the next day. Use our free protein calculator to find out how much protein you should be consuming each day, and how to space your servings of protein throughout the day for the best results*.

How To Use Ascent’s Protein Intake Calculator

To use our protein intake calculator, enter your details into the online quiz. Try to be exact when entering your information into the protein calculator. Provide your weight, exercise/activity level, and your personal fitness goals. From there, our protein calculator will do the rest and calculate how much protein you should be consuming each day. Your results will be provided at the end of the quiz. Your individual information will not be shared.

How Much Protein Do I Need?

Figuring out how much protein you need a day depends on your weight, activity levels and your fitness goals. For example, an athlete who weighs 185lbs will need to consume more protein than an athlete who weighs 135lbs. Similarly, if your goal is to gain muscle while losing fat, you will need to increase your protein intake in order to support your muscle repair, recovery & fitness goals.

Additionally, the timing of your protein servings matter, as your body cannot “store” protein for future use. That is why Ascent recommends spacing your protein intake across the day. Our protein calculator can help you understand how you can achieve this through your daily protein intake.

Determining how much protein you should consumer in a day will depend based on each individual’s physical goals.

What foods should I consume for my protein?

Figuring out how much protein you need a day depends on your weight, activity levels and your fitness goals. For example, an athlete who weighs 185lbs will need to consume more protein than an athlete who weighs 135lbs. Similarly, if your goal is to gain muscle while losing fat, you will need to increase your protein intake in order to support your muscle repair, recovery & fitness goals.

Additionally, the timing of your protein servings matter, as your body cannot “store” protein for future use. That is why Ascent recommends spacing your protein intake across the day. Our protein calculator can help you understand how you can achieve this through your daily protein intake. The best source for protein will always come from whole food sources – including meats, eggs, nuts, etc. Plant-based protein sources might also include legumes, lentils and seeds. Choosing your protein source is based on individual dietary restrictions and preferences.

Ascent sources all of its protein from real food – including its Whey and Plant proteins. Ascent whey protein is made with Native Whey – a revolutionary process which allows us to extract whey protein in its most native form – without compromising the integrity of the protein’s amino acid profile. This results in higher levels of leucine – they key amino acid needed for muscle protein synthesis and absorption. Both of Ascent’s Plant Protein & Whey Protein contain a complete amino acid profile, ensuring you have enough leucine to repair muscle. 

Will Protein Make Me Bulk?

There is a common misconception that protein alone will make athletes bulk. Protein is not the cause for “bulking”, but instead a way to help your muscles recover and get back to your training. The muscle mass you build will largely be determined by your physical training regimen and the diet outside of the protein powder you consume.

Additionally, Ascent is formulated with only real food ingredients & zero artificial ones. We don’t include any junk, fillers or gimmicks, just clean protein to support your muscle health goals.

Does the Quality of Protein Matter?

Reaching your fitness goals is no easy task. When you’re training hard, protein is necessary to help you recover. But what protein sources are the best?

With our whey protein powders, plant protein powders, micellar casein, and revolutionary Recovery Water, you have several ways to incorporate protein within your daily diet.

Ascent provides several ways to reach your recommended protein intake goals. With our whey protein powders, micellar casein, and revolutionary Recovery Water, you have several ways to incorporate protein within your daily diet.

How Often Should I Take Protein?

Protein is a critical element into your daily diet. However, taking your protein throughout the day is recommended as your body cannot “store” protein for future use.

One method for spacing your protein throughout the day is to consume 5 meals within a day – adjusting the size/quantity of each meal to fit your dietary needs.

You can utilize Ascent protein after a workout as a great way to increase your protein intake for the day. It is a great way to recover post-workout in order to help you reach your fitness goals.

Can I Have Too Much Protein In My Diet?

Current science suggests the maximum amount of recommended daily protein is approximately 1 gram per 1 lb of body weight. This is also assuming the daily amount is timed and spaced appropriately throughout the day. For example, if you weight 165 lbs, it is recommended you not exceed more than 165 grams of protein in a day.

What are the Best Sources of Protein?

The best food sources for protein will always be real food sources. However, the most important part is ensuring the amino acid profile within a protein source is complete. That is why Ascent protein is sourced from real food ingredients and includes a complete amino acid profile.

However, if you are searching for more protein food sources, below are a few examples.

Meat/dairy protein sources:

• Eggs

• Milk

• Fish – including tuna and shrimp

• Greek yogurt

• Chicken breast

• Cottage cheese

Plant-based protein sources:

• Lentils

• Quinoa

• Soy

• Nuts & seeds

• Peas

Ways to Increase Your Protein Intake

There are several ways you can increase your protein intake. One way is by utilizing Ascent protein after a workout, and micellar casein prior to going to sleep at night. Doing these two things each day can increase your protein intake by 50g.

However, there are several other ways you can increase your protein intake including:

• Incorporating high-protein foods into your breakfast

• Adding seeds or nuts into your meals

• Choosing protein rich snacks including almonds or a Greek yogurt

• Focus on building protein centered recipes. Ascent has several recipes you can check out online!

Sources For All Data

Morton, Robert W., Chris McGlory, and Stuart M. Phillips - "Nutritional interventions to augment resistance training-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy" Copyright © 2015 Morton, McGlory and Phillips. Front Physiol 2015; 6: 245. Published online 2015 Sep 3. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2015.00245

Phillips, Stuart M. - "The impact of protein quality on the promotion of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle mass" Nutrition & Metabolism 2016 13:64 DOI: 10.1186/s12986-016-0124-8

Thomas M. Doering, Peter R. Reaburn, Stuart M. Phillips, et. Al. - "Postexercise Dietary Protein Strategies to Maximize Skeletal Muscle Repair and Remodeling in Masters Endurance Athletes: A Review" and "What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?" International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Volume 26 Issue 2, April 2016

Phillips, S. M. (2014a). - "A brief review of higher dietary protein diets in weight loss: a focus on athletes" Sport. Med. 2014

Phillips, Stuart M. - "A brief review of critical processes in exercise-induced muscular hypertrophy" Sports Med. 2014; 44(Suppl 1): 71–77. Published online 2014 May 3. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0152-3

Disclaimers

*Individuals with special dietary needs or underlying health conditions should consult a healthcare professional for protein intake.

See how much
protein you need

  • 1. weight & routine
  • 2. goals
  • 3. dietary restrictions
  • 4. results

DIETARY RESTRICTIONS

Please check off any dietary restrictions that apply to you

Vegan/Plant-Based

Dairy Free

Gluten Free

Soy Free

No Dietary Restrictions

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How do you typically take your protein?

Select all that apply.

Smoothie

After a Workout Mixing With Water

On-The-Go

Before Bed

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Results

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Results

PROTEIN

0

GRAMS DAILY*

Here is the recommended amount of protein (listed in grams) you should be consuming per day. Meeting this amount of protein per day can be accomplished through a combination of meals and Ascent Protein.

How Frequently Should I Take Protein?

Timing and spacing of protein servings matter as your body cannot “store” protein for future use (*6).

Here’s a good framework for how to think about achieving your target number each day:

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

  • Protein quality matters. These results are based on consuming high-quality protein sources like Ascent protein. If you are consuming lower-quality proteins as your primary sources, then you’ll need to increase your daily target number (*2).
  • Gender. There is no scientific data to suggest men and women differ substantially in their protein needs, other than body weight (*1).
  • Maximum daily amount. Current science suggests the maximum amount of recommended daily protein is approximately 1 gram per 1 lb of body weight, assuming this daily amount is timed and spaced appropriately throughout the day

Sources for all data

(1) Morton, Robert W., Chris McGlory, and Stuart M. Phillips - "Nutritional interventions to augment resistance training-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy" Copyright © 2015 Morton, McGlory and Phillips. Front Physiol 2015; 6: 245. Published online 2015 Sep 3. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2015.00245

(2) Phillips, Stuart M. - "The impact of protein quality on the promotion of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle mass" Nutrition & Metabolism 2016 13:64 DOI: 10.1186/s12986-016-0124-8

(3) Thomas M. Doering, Peter R. Reaburn, Stuart M. Phillips, et. Al. - "Postexercise Dietary Protein Strategies to Maximize Skeletal Muscle Repair and Remodeling in Masters Endurance Athletes: A Review" and "What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?" International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Volume 26 Issue 2, April 2016

(4) Phillips, S. M. (2014a). - "A brief review of higher dietary protein diets in weight loss: a focus on athletes" Sport. Med. 2014

(5) Murphy CH, Hector AJ, Stuart M Phillips, - "Considerations for protein intake in managing weight loss in athletes" Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(1):21-8. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2014.936325. Epub 2014 Jul 11.

(6) Phillips, Stuart M. - "A brief review of critical processes in exercise-induced muscular hypertrophy" Sports Med. 2014; 44(Suppl 1): 71–77. Published online 2014 May 3. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0152-3